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Phrases in survey questions that bug you


Trueblue
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the one that I always get a rise out of me is "someone like me" WHY NOT ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!??????????????????????????

 

also "you are aware of" what difference does it make you are gonna ask me about specific ones anyway, geez

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11 hours ago, peach6 said:

After you click retired they ask you what your job title is (are they not paying attention)

Love that one as well. Been retired (disabled) over 2 years now.

The other one I like is when they ask your age (61) , then how many people live in the household (1) , followed by "any children?".

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Or how about how many people are living in your house?Well ,all of us are alive .

 

LOL-I know that one might be a little facetious but I couldn't help myself.

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"Exact" age. Like I have more than one? Children. Adult children(over 18) or under 18? Please distinguish between them if it matters to the survey creator. Too often I choose to indicate I have a child  and the next page asks what age under 18? I have an adult child over 18 and none under 18. If I live to be 100 they will still be my "child".

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19 hours ago, paulgro said:

What state do you live in after you've already entered your zip code like they can't tell from that.

I've always wondered about that. Do zip codes cover more than one state in some places? Seems redundant if they don't. Zip codes are numbered with the first digit of 1 meaning the location is on the east coast and 9 as the first digit indicating on the west coast. And then there's everything in between from 2 to 8.

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4 minutes ago, JD said:

I've always wondered about that. Do zip codes cover more than one state in some places? Seems redundant if they don't. Zip codes are numbered with the first digit of 1 meaning the location is on the east coast and 9 as the first digit indicating on the west coast. And then there's everything in between from 2 to 8.

0 is also used on the east coast. I lived in NJ and the zip was 07480. Maybe they want to see if you are telling the truth.about what state you live in. I believe the zip is from the Post Office and is used for a section of that state but I could be wrong. I don't believe two states would use the same code.

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1 hour ago, paulgro said:

0 is also used on the east coast. I lived in NJ and the zip was 07480. Maybe they want to see if you are telling the truth.about what state you live in. I believe the zip is from the Post Office and is used for a section of that state but I could be wrong. I don't believe two states would use the same code.

Forgot about 0. Well apparently zip codes do cross state lines. Hence the need to ask for state as well.

Can ZIP Codes cross State, County, political jurisdictions and metro areas?

Yes they can and do, however, this is not the norm. ZIP Codes rarely cross state lines but do more frequently cross county lines. You can see this yourself by viewing a ZIP code map. The reason for this is that ZIP Codes are service delivery areas and do not necessarily need to adhere to other geopolitical boundaries. For example, it may be more efficient to service a particular area from one post office even though it is in a different State or County.

 

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They're probably asking all of these silly somewhat repetitive to see if you're really paying attention and not randomly clicking/have 5 different surveys open and randomly clicking.

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I always cringe when I see "how old were you on your last birthday?" It sounds like they think their respondents are children. "What is your age?" is much more direct.

 

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On 8/31/2017 at 2:37 AM, JR said:

I always cringe when I see "how old were you on your last birthday?" It sounds like they think their respondents are children. "What is your age?" is much more direct.

 

That I do understand because they put all surveys takers in order of age groups. So 18 to 20 year old's have this in common while 30 to 50 year old's have something else in common. Gives an idea how the different age groups think or use products.

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On 9/3/2017 at 3:26 PM, paulgro said:

That I do understand because they put all surveys takers in order of age groups. So 18 to 20 year old's have this in common while 30 to 50 year old's have something else in common. Gives an idea how the different age groups think or use products.

I totally understand that they need to ask for ages for respondents, but it's just the wording that bugs me when they ask, "how old were you on your last birthday?" It just sounds so clunky and stupid when they could've just asked, "what is your age?" like most surveys do.

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Yeah, that one does bug me - like they think we're so stupid, we can't understand a simple question like "how old are you today", and have to dumb it down for us. Though actually, the one that bugs me the most is also age related: there's one survey company I've seen a few times (don't remember the one, it's the one that uses birthday candles and makes you click on them) - they say something like "we really hate to ask, but we have to know: how old are you?" No, you don't hate to ask us, it's a basic question every survey asks, and why would we not want to answer it, anyway? That makes no sense.

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